You asked: Does South America touch the Southern Ocean?

Is the Southern Ocean in South America?

In the 1928 first edition of Limits of Oceans and Seas, the Southern Ocean was delineated by land-based limits: Antarctica to the south, and South America, Africa, Australia, and Broughton Island, New Zealand to the north.

Where does the Southern Ocean Touch?

The Southern Ocean, also known as the Antarctic Ocean is an enormous body of water that surrounds the entire continent of Antarctica and reaches Australia and the southern end of South America.

What ocean does South America touch?

The Atlantic Ocean lies between North and South America on the west and Europe and Africa on the east. Up north, the Atlantic connects to the Arctic Ocean and to the Southern Ocean to the south. Scientists often divide the Atlantic into two basins: the North Atlantic and the South Atlantic.

What continents does the Southern Ocean Touch?

You might also like:

Ocean Area Continents the Ocean Touches
Atlantic 106,400,000 sq km Africa, Europe, North America, South America
Indian 73,560,000 sq km Africa, Australia, Asia
Pacific 165,250,000 sq km Asia, Australia, North America, South America
Southern 20,330,000 sq km Antarctica

Is Southern Ocean a thing?

The Southern Ocean is the ‘newest’ named ocean. It is recognized by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names as the body of water extending from the coast of Antarctica to the line of latitude at 60 degrees South. The boundaries of this ocean were proposed to the International Hydrographic Organization in 2000.

THIS IS INTERESTING:  What are some fun facts about Argentina?

Who approved the Southern Ocean as the world’s 5th ocean?

Soon after, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recognized the body of water as the fifth ocean in 1999 after the Board of Geographic Names approved the title, “Southern Ocean,” reports Paulina Firozi for the Washington Post.

Why is the Pacific higher than the Atlantic?

Sea level is about 20 cm higher on the Pacific side than the Atlantic due to the water being less dense on average on the Pacific side and due to the prevailing weather and ocean conditions. Such sea level differences are common across many short sections of land dividing ocean basins.